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Examples of employment fraud include:
  • False recruiting for a job that doesn't exist
  • Promising a good salary for a job that only pays commissions
  • Promising you additional compensation but not delivering it
  • Failing to disclose the short-term nature of the job
If you were fraudulently induced to accept employment, and the new job required you moving double damages may be available to compensate you for the employment fraud

Contact an Employment Fraud Attorney - Se habla espanol, llamame ahora!

To speak with an Oxnard employment lawyer, call 877-525-0700 toll free. We handle all cases on a contingency fee basis with no upfront costs. Se habla español.

Important Employment Laws

Most non-lawyers think primarily of federal protections enforced by the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC) when considering the rights of employees.

While laws such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title VII, the Equal Pay Act of 1963 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 form an essential foundation for action against employers for illegal mistreatment of workers, California has its own laws that, in most cases, further extend citizens' rights to fair and equal treatment in the workplace and provide much greater protection than the federal laws.

Our founding attorney Karl Gerber and our team at the Ventura area Employment Lawyers Group are deeply versed in the content and application of important employment laws such as these sections of the California Government Code:

Section 12920 — The California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) — which protects "the right and opportunity of all persons to seek, obtain, and hold employment without discrimination or abridgment on account of race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, cancer, mental disability, medical condition, marital status, sex, age, or sexual orientation"

Section 12926, which provide definitions and parameters for terms such as disability, sexual orientation and many more, as well as extensive, specific statements on prohibited activities and limitations of the law
Section 12940 of the Government Code, covering prohibition of harassment and discrimination on the basis of age, sex, race, national origin or disability

Section 12941, "broadly and vigorously" reinforcing existing laws prohibiting age discrimination in recognition that older workers, as a group, "face unique obstacles in the later phases of their careers"

Sections 12945 — the California Family Rights Act — and 12945.2, addressing unlawful employment practices surrounding "pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition"

Important sections of the California Labor Code that we often reference and cite in our work on behalf of wronged employees include:

Section 132a, addressing the rights of workers injured in the course of their employment

Sections 201 and 203, 226, 226.7, 510 and 512, addressing employer obligations involving unpaid wages, required payment for work performed, rest and meal breaks, overtime pay, penalties and other matters broadly categorized as wage and hour issues

Sections 1102.5 and 6310 addressing the rights of workers to report employers' suspected illegal activities to government agency, and their protection against various forms of retaliation, including wrongful termination for doing so

Section 6311, prohibiting improper layoff or discharge of employees who refuse to perform work that violates state or federal safety standards

Section 6400, addressing employer responsibility to provide "safe and healthful" work conditions and environments